<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none;" alt="" src="https://dc.ads.linkedin.com/collect/?pid=1152810&amp;fmt=gif">

Dallas, Texas KIPP Truth Elementary School Case Study

on Jul 16, 2017 7:00:00 PM By Rebeca Easton | 0 Comments | Research
Executive Summary The Challenge KIPP Truth Elementary School was looking for a solution to help teach emotional regulation and behavior skills to their students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Located in a traditionally underserved neighborhood in Dallas, Texas, KIPP Truth is a college prep school that has set independent learning and self-management as primary goals for all students. However, reaching these goals had proved challenging for their students with ASD. Some of the students were non-verbal and all faced severe challenges with self-regulation and social skills, making academic progress difficult, if not impossible. The Solution When Katie Hill, KIPP Truth’s principal, first heard about Robots4Autism from a colleague, she was skeptical. But when she saw Milo in action, she thought, “Wow! This could be really special!” Ms. Hill decided to implement Robots4Autism at KIPP Truth as a way to provide a comprehensive, systematic curriculum that improves the social and self-regulation skills in her students with ASD. The curriculum is delivered through Milo, a highly expressive, advanced social robot designed specifically to model and teach critical skills to learners with ASD. The student and Milo engage through social narratives, with Milo connected to a student’s tablet where the robot can display multiple choice options and show supporting text, icons, and video modeling to enhance the lesson. The Impact As Ms. Hill recalled, as soon as Milo was powered on, the child “could not take his eyes off it” and immediately engaged with and followed all of Milo’s instructions. Ms. Sarah Hoff, the Special Education teacher, reported that eight of her students have been consistently working with Milo throughout the school year. Here are just a few of the results: Student-to-student confrontations were eliminated Self-regulation was demonstrated by all participating students All students showed improvement in social interactions Academic gains immediately followed self-regulation Students effectively used calm down tools IEP goals are now being regularly achieved These students faced severe challenges with self-regulation and social skills—common issues that made academic progress extremely difficult. Working with Milo and the KIPP staff helped these students learn how to calm down and get along with others. This, in turn, helped them to focus on their academics, providing significantly more opportunities than previously thought possible. Read the full KIPP Truth Elementary Robots4Autism Case Study.
Read More

DE-ENIGMA Project – Robots Teaching Children with ASD to Mind Read: A Feasibility Study of Child-Robot Interaction during Emotion-Recognition Training

on May 11, 2017 7:00:00 PM By Jeff Goodman | 0 Comments | Research
  Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often have difficulty recognizing emotions and facial expressions relative to typically developing children. Several existing projects have shown promise in using robot-assisted interventions for social and academic skills teaching with children with ASD, including emotion recognition. Robots can be more predictable and less complex than interaction with humans, and may be more “comfortable” for autistic children. Little is known, however, about the levels of language, cognitive skill, or sensory tolerance that are necessary or desirable for robot-assisted interventions to be implemented effectively for autistic children.   A. M. Alcorn1, T. Tavassoli1, S. Babović Dimitrijevic2, S. Petrović2, S. Skendzic2, V. Petrović2 and E. Pellicano3, (1)UCL Institute of Education, University College London, Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE), London, United Kingdom, (2)Serbian Society of Autism, Belgrade, Serbia, (3)Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE), UCL Institute of Education, University College London, London, United Kingdom Link to Research Summary
Read More

Spartanburg, SC Case Study Executive Summary

on Dec 6, 2016 6:00:00 PM By Richard Margolin | 0 Comments | Research Success Stories
CASE STUDY: Children with autism in Spartanburg (SC) show  dramatic improvement with Milo, the social robot. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Bottom Line The McCarthy Teszler School in Spartanburg, SC, discovered that a humanoid robot named Milo was an extremely effective way to engage their students with autism and teach social skills, communication skills, and behavior management. Background The McCarthy Teszler School provides services for approximately 240 special ed students, 90 of whom are on the autism spectrum. These students with autism represent some of the most challenging cases coming from 7 local school districts. Though standard therapies and instruction had been employed school administrators knew that these students were not progressing. Developed by Robots4Autism in collaboration with top national autism experts, Milo is a highly expressive, advanced social robot designed specifically to teach critical skills to children with autism. Elena Ghionis, lead autism specialist for Spartanburg County, explained that one of the main reasons they chose Milo was because his “was the only curriculum we found that combined instruction in all three key areas of need: social skills, communication skills, and emotion regulation.” Impact Initially, 17 students were included in the study with Milo. Here a just a few of the results: Prior to using Milo, all 17 students showed minimal progress toward their IEP goals. After using Milo, all 17 showed significant progress or even mastery related to their social, communication, behavioral, and academic goals. Every child had a behavioral intervention plan to extend their school day. The center achieved that goal in 2½ months and was able to move those children to attend full day. Of the 17 students who participated in the study, 8 showed improvements on both the 4-score index and the 6-score index on the GARS 3. Of the 17 students who participated in the study, 5 or 6 will start the school year in a mainstream classroom. The autism specialists at McCarthy Teszler all agree that they now consider Milo and the Robots4Autism curriculum to be a vital therapy tool for their students with autism. As Ms. Ghionis put it, “Without Milo, we could not have good outcomes.” Download Case Study
Read More

Robots4Autism: New Frontiers in Clinical Research

on Nov 7, 2016 6:00:00 PM By Richard Margolin | 0 Comments | Research
Video credit: Autism Programs and Research, UTD Callier Center for Communication Disorders
Read More

Robots as Tools to Help Children with ASD to Identify Emotions

on Oct 6, 2016 7:00:00 PM By Robots 4 Autism | 0 Comments | Research
Sandra Costa, Department of Electronic Engineering, Algoritmi Research Centre, University of Minho, Portugal Research on human-robot interaction has demonstrated that robots improve the response level, involvement and interest in children with ASD and promote new social behaviours. One important remark is that this kind of research does not intend to replace the work performed by professionals with children with ASD, but to provide a complementary tool. In Robotica-Autismo project, a humanoid robot with the capability of displaying facial expressions is intended to be used as a tool to promote social interaction, communication and mainly emotion labeling. Download the Study
Read More

Technology-Aided Instruction is Now Classified as One of the 27 Intervention Practices for Children with Autism

on Oct 6, 2016 7:00:00 PM By Robots 4 Autism | 0 Comments | Research
Pamela R Rollins, MS, EdD, CCC/SLP; and Michelle Neilon McFarlin, MS, CCC/SLP The past decade has seen a surge in the use of technology to accelerate progress and support professionals and caregivers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Technology-Aided Instruction is now classified as one of the 27 intervention practices that have sound scientific evidence for increasing social skills in children with ASD. Recently, humanoid robots have been developed to fulfill a variety of human-like functions, creating the possibility of being a co-therapist to improve social skills in children with ASD. While research into robot-assisted intervention is in its infancy, early findings suggest social robotics to be a promising intervention practice for teaching social skills to children with ASD. Download the Study
Read More

Realistic Humanlike Robots for Treatment of ASD, Social Training, and Research; Shown to Appeal to Youths with ASD, Cause Physiological Arousal, and Increase Human-to-Human Social Engagement

on Oct 6, 2016 7:00:00 PM By Robots 4 Autism | 0 Comments | Research
David Hanson, Ph.D., et. al. This paper describes results from preliminary psychology experiments, which indicate that people (both children and adults) with autism or ASD accept realistic human-like robots, are not afraid of such robots, find such robots appealing and engaging, and may be more likely to increase social awareness as a result of interacting with such robots. Download the Study
Read More

Robots4Autism: Using a Humanoid Robot as a Co-therapist with Children with ASD

on Oct 6, 2016 7:00:00 PM By Jeff Goodman | 0 Comments | Research
Allison Kroiss, B.S., Danielle Sonego, B.S., Pamela Rollins Ed.D, CCC-SLP Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) exhibit significant impairments in development in social relatedness, reciprocal social behavior, social communication, joint attention, and language learning. Children with ASD have a preference for objects over people (Lombroso et al., 2009) in addition to superior nonsocial skills constructing and analyzing systems (i.e., computers and robots) (Baron-Cohen, 2005; Baron-Cohen, 2009). Recent research suggests that despite individual differences in performance, children with ASD show more social engagement with a robot as compared to humans or other technological devices (Diehl et al., 2014; Bekele et al., 2013). Download the Study
Read More

Innovative Technology to Facilitate Social Intelligence in Autism Spectrum Disorders

on Oct 6, 2016 7:00:00 PM By Robots 4 Autism | 0 Comments | Research
Fred Margolin & Pamela R. Rollins, MS Ed.D. ccc-slp Social skills intervention for children with ASD needs to focus on improving Theory of Mind skills to help with the understanding of emotions, relevant social cues, perspectives and appropriate responses. In addition it is helpful if the intervention facilitates coherence providing multiple ways for the child to gain meaning about the social situation. Social narratives and video modeling are two evidenced based practices that facilitate social understanding and coherence. Social narratives describe social situations highlighting the relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses. Video modeling is a Technology-Aided Instruction that uses short video to provide a visual model of the targeted social skills. Implementing these interventions in combination through humanoid robot technology can have several advantages over human to human communication when facilitating Theory of Mind and social skill. Download the Study
Read More

Recent Posts

Subscribe